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Article
June 1928

THE VOICE IN SINGING AND IN SPEAKING

Arch Otolaryngol. 1928;7(6):627-630. doi:10.1001/archotol.1928.00620010655011

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Abstract

Singing and speaking are closely associated, but they are different processes, and different training of the voice is necessary. They are two distinct mechanisms, but because they are carried on simultaneously, they have been erroneously considered as varieties of the same process. They differ in physiology, production and characteristics, both subjectively and objectively.

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SINGING AND SPEAKING

Objective.—The objective differences between singing and speaking are found in the range, pitch, duration and quality of the voice. Singing is usually rapid and overlapping or slurred, but this is not necessarily true of speaking. In singing, the voice ranges over two octaves or more. In speaking, it rarely covers even one octave. Singing is at a sustained pitch, whereas in speaking the pitch varies, changes and is short in duration.

Subjective.—Sound depends on the proper functioning of four mechanisms—the motor, the vibrator, the resonators and the articulators. The

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