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Article
July 1928

CONTRACTION OF THE VISUAL FIELDS IN CASES OF PROGRESSIVE DEAFNESSREPORT OF CASES AND A COMPARISON WITH CASES OF DEAFNESS OF OTHER TYPES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1928;8(1):12-25. doi:10.1001/archotol.1928.00620020020002
Abstract

According to the understanding herein implied, progressive deafness is a condition in which the organ of hearing gradually becomes more deficient in its capacity to perceive and to convey sounds to the brain. It is caused by some constitutional abnormality and therefore may also be termed "constitutional" deafness. It occurs more frequently in women than in men. It may begin at any age, but it more commonly has its onset during late adolescence or early adult life. Its onset is insidious, the patient not experiencing its presence until a fairly large portion of the hearing ability has been incapacitated. One of the first symptoms is tinnitus, which is annoying. Dizziness may be an early or late symptom, but it is not common. Paracusis is a frequent experience.

Those who have no inflammation of the middle ear have normal drums and patent eustachian tubes. At times, a pink zone is seen

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