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Article
February 1929

MULTIPLE PRIMARY CARCINOMAS OF THE LARYNX AND ESOPHAGUS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy and the William Pepper Laboratory of Clinical Medicine of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;9(2):154-158. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620030168003
Abstract

Multiple growths occur in 4.7 per cent of all cases of malignant neoplasms, according to Owen.1 These figures are much higher than those for multiple primary carcinomas alone which are found to occur in only 0.5 per cent of all cases by von Hansemann2 and in 0.4 per cent by Redlich.3 The basal cell type of squamous cell carcinoma is by far the most common of the carcinomas, and although the case herein reported is of this type, the infrequency of malignant changes occurring simultaneously in the esophagus and larynx is worthy of note. It is well known that multiple primary tumors of the same type, i. e., carcinomas, more frequently attack a single organ than they do separate organs of the same or different systems. This higher percentage is due, perhaps, to the more frequent involvement of the skin by multiple primary carcinomas. With considerably

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