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Article
April 1929

STENOSIS OF THE NASOLACRIMAL PASSAGEWAYSTHE RESULTING PATHOLOGIC CONDITION AND ITS TREATMENT

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;9(4):367-375. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620030389001
Abstract

Stenosis and the resulting inflammation of the nasolacrimal passageways are responsible for two common complaints—overflow of tears and collection of pus in the eyes—and, to be 100 per cent efficient, any treatment for such conditions must give relief from these two complaints.

To insure a proper understanding of the problem presented, we must first review the anatomy of the normal nasolacrimal passageways. These passageways consist of the two lacrimal canaliculi, running from the free margin of the upper and the lower lid. These run at first vertically for a short distance and then turn to run medially, converging toward the lacrimal sac, and unite to form the common canaliculus just before entering the lacrimal sac. The lacrimal sac is the upper dilated end of the nasolacrimal duct and is lodged in a deep groove formed by the lacrimal bone and the ascending process of the superior maxilla.

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