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Article
June 1929

STUDIES IN ASTHMA: IV. THE NOSE AND THROAT IN ASTHMA

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Outpatient Department of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;9(6):612-621. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620030644003
Abstract

A recent review and follow up1 of 1,074 patients with asthma has made available a large amount of clinical data. The present study, based on these data, aims to find the part played by focal infections and other disturbances in the nose, throat and teeth in asthma of all kinds.

Since Voltolini2 in 1880 reported a cure of asthma following the removal of a nasal polyp, the literature on the subject has contained a great number of articles, in some of which the authors are enthusiastic about the results of local treatment, while in others, they try to show that in spite of procedures both simple and radical, the disease seems to progress without change.

So many patients with asthma have well defined lesions in the nose, throat or sinuses that various authors, particularly Sluder,3 considered that the bronchial spasm was merely a reflex effect of some

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