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Article
July 1929

CONGENITAL ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA IN THE TYMPANUM

Author Affiliations

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.
From the Grand Rapids Clinic.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(1):32-38. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620040042004
Abstract

The case presented in this paper is one of congenital arteriovenous fistula of the jugular bulb and the internal carotid artery in the right ear, characterized by deafness and a constant pounding noise in the right side of the head since childhood, total absence of the bony floor of the tympanum and the external canal, the presence in the tympanum and external canal of an occluding, pinkish-blue pulsating mass and, finally, spontaneous hemorrhage at the age of 24.

Congenital arteriovenous aneurysm unassociated with nevus is rare. Halsted1 found only 2 examples without nevus and 6 with nevus in the review of 400 cases in 1918. I am unable to find in the literature the report of any case of congenital fistula between the jugular bulb and the internal carotid artery. This is particularly surprising in view of the origin and development of those two vessels and their anatomic proximity.

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