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Article
July 1929

THE RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF DISEASE OF THE NASAL SINUSES AS A CAUSE OF DISEASE OF THE OPTIC NERVES

Author Affiliations

MEMPHIS, TENN.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(1):49-60. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620040059006
Abstract

About 1910 there began to appear case reports illustrating the intimate connection sometimes found between certain diseases of the eye, especially diseases of the optic nerve—and more especially the form called retrobulbar neuritis—unaccompanied by visible changes in the nerve- and nasal diseases, especially diseases of certain of the nasal sinuses, namely the posterior ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses. Attention was called by many studies to the close anatomic relation of these sinuses to the nerve. One of the early papers was that of Smith,1 who reported three convincing cases and advocated exploratory operation in doubtful cases. He thought the depletion of the tissues by bleeding helped, even though no gross pathologic changes were found. Another early paper of note was that of Augstein,2 who reported a case in which blindness of sudden onset slowly improved following an operation on nasal sinuses that appeared normal. In three months, one

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