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Article
August 1929

ACUTE INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS: FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF AN OTOLARYNGOLOGIST

Author Affiliations

WILMINGTON, DEL.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(2):171-176. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620050067005
Abstract

The disease which is the subject of this paper is of interest to the otolaryngologist as well as to the internist, from both the practical and the theoretical standpoint. Previous to 1920, following E. Pfeiffer's1 description in 1889 of a condition in children which he called Drüsenfieber, cases of fever lasting from nine to twenty-seven days, accompanied by enlargement of the lymph nodes and called glandular fever, were described in the literature. Tidy and Morley2 regarded this condition as identical with acute infectious mononucleosis, but there is no proof that this is true. Before 1920, when Spruant and Evans3 first described the disease as a clinical entity, there had been no study reported of the blood picture. In 1922 Longcope4 reported ten cases, and in 1927 Cottrell reported twelve cases. In Longcope's series the first recorded case he saw was in 1909,

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