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Article
August 1929

CALCULUS OF THE SUBMAXILLARY GLAND AND DUCT

Author Affiliations

(MEDICAL) ROANOKE, VA.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(2):177-187. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620050073006
Abstract

Calculus of the submaxillary gland and duct was first mentioned in the literature of the seventeenth century. Little has been written in textbooks on this subject. The condition is never responsible for death, which naturally causes it to occupy a humble place in surgery.

The infrequency with which submaxillary calculi appear, the importance of the clinical symptoms and the difficulties experienced in making a correct diagnosis induce me to select this subject. The necessity of making a correct diagnosis of submaxillary calculi is of extreme clinical importance in order to prevent needless treatment. This may be medical or surgical.

Before I describe the various conditions manifested by pain and swelling in the floor of the mouth and in the submaxillary triangle, it may not be untimely to review briefly the anatomy and physiology of this important structure.

SURGICAL ANATOMY

The submaxillary gland lies in the submaxillary triangle, adapting its

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