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October 1929

VINCENT'S ORGANISMSIN CHRONIC SINUSITIS, OSTEOMYELITIS OF FRONTAL BONE, ORBITAL CELLULITIS, MENINGITIS AND PULMONARY GANGRENEREPORT OF A CASE

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(4):384-397. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620070058002
Abstract

The spirochetes and fusiform bacilli that are commonly grouped as Vincent's organisms are frequently associated with infections in and about the tonsils, teeth, genital organs and gastro-intestinal tract (Davis and Pilot,1 Varney2). The exact rôle played by these organisms in the pathogenesis of the ulcerative and gangrenous process in these and other locations of the body is unknown. According to Lasagna,3 they "live in symbiosis with other micro-organisms in the necrobiotic ulcer, and together with them determine the initial lesion." Pratt4 believed that "under certain abnormal conditions these bacteria increase and probably function as secondary infecting agents." Davis, discussing Pearce's paper, "The Specificity of Spirochetes in Diseases of the Eye, Ear and Nose,"5 stated: "Certain spirochetes are often associated with fusiform bacilli and a pyogenic coccus in their disease activities. These organisms furnish an excellent example of how bacteria may cooperate in this way causing

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