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Article
November 1929

THE RELATION OF THE AORTA TO ESOPHAGOSCOPY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Chevalier Jackson Bronchoscopic Clinics, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(5):447-458. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620080011001
Abstract

The intimate relation of the aorta to the esophagus renders it a structure always to be taken account of in esophagoscopy,1 yet in practice the healthy aorta causes the endoscopist little concern. The normal aorta offers no resistance to the passage of the esophagoscope, and when during esophagoscopy the position of the patient is properly maintained, there is little danger of inflicting injury on the aorta.

The arch of the aorta, in its course posteriorly to reach the vertebral column, crosses to the left side of the esophagus. The aorta in its first relationship, therefore, lies anterior and to the left of the esophagus. At a more inferior level, in the lower thoracic region, the aorta passes behind the esophagus, and at the level of the diaphragm it lies posterior and slightly to the right.2 In its course backward, the arch of the aorta normally impinges on the

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