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Article
November 1929

OSTEOGENESIS OF THE HUMAN PERIOTIC CAPSULE

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.
From the Department of Anatomy, University of Wisconsin.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(5):459-471. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620080023002
Abstract

The petrous portion of the temporal bone and in particular the otic capsule, which stands alone in the category of bones, is of interest from a purely embryologic and anatomic standpoint because of its unique structure, both gross and histologic; but a thorough knowledge of the development and structure of this bone may prove of importance in throwing light on the mystery surrounding otosclerosis and its supposed relation to the dreaded disease, progressive deafness.

The bony otic capsule which houses the sense organs of hearing and equilibrium differs from other bones as to form, structure and function. Bones are conventionally classified as long or cartilage bones and flat or membrane bones. While the otic capsule is classified with cartilage bones, it is neither a long bone nor a flat bone. It is a capsular bone. The cranium is also a bony box, but it is made up of a number

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