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Article
November 1929

THE EFFECT OF AUDIBLE AND OF SUBAUDIBLE VIBRATIONS ON THE ACUITY OF HEARING

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Department of Physics, University of California at Los Angeles.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(5):472-479. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620080036003
Abstract

This paper presents the results of studies which were continued in connection with the subject of paracusis,1 and especially an extension of those studies into the field of subaudible vibrations. Briefly, our tests have indicated the following: 1. No one hears better in the presence of a noise. 2. No one hears better in the presence of subaudible vibrations. In other words, both audible and subaudible vibrations, under all conditions, fail to increase the acuity of hearing.

It would seem that this subject has a definite bearing on clinical practice, in that for the past few years many methods based on the use of audible and inaudible vibrations have been advanced and used clinically for the improvement of hearing. As somewhat favorable statements have been made as to the value of such methods of treatment, it seemed to us that it would be helpful to put the matter to

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