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Article
December 1929

PLASTIC SURGERY OF THE EAR, NOSE AND FACE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Plastic Surgery, Leland Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1929;10(6):575-584. doi:10.1001/archotol.1929.00620090017001
Abstract

Though plastic surgery showed great development as the result of necessity during the World War, its origin dates back to the time of earliest antiquity. Researches by Mauclaire, of the medical faculty of the University of Paris, reveal histories of the priest-surgeons of India and cases of rhinoplasty as early as 800 B.C. These cases were the result of the custom at that time of cutting off the nose as a punishment for theft. The operation consisted of peeling down a skin flap from the forehead, leaving the lower end attached and shaping it into a rough semblance of a nose. Such punitive mutilations were common during those ancient times.

In 1440 A.D. the Brancas, noted surgeons of their day, developed the Italian method of rhinoplasty. Narrow strips of skin cut from the inner surface of the arm were used to restore lost noses, the arm being immured in

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