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Article
August 1930

PNEUMOBACILLUS (FRIEDLANDER'S) MENINGITIS SECONDARY TO OTITIS MEDIA: REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Division of Cranial Surgery of Dr. Wells P. Eagleton, Newark Eye and Ear Infirmary, Newark, N. J.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1930;12(2):162-174. doi:10.1001/archotol.1930.03570010190003
Abstract

That the pneumobacillus was the cause of many fatal cases of meningitis during the epidemic of 1918 and that many deaths are caused by this organism yearly are well known to the medical profession; yet there appears to be hardly any cases on record in American medical literature. Isolated cases of Friedlander's bacillus septicemia have been described.1 Brain and Valentine2 reported a case of infection of the meninges and the blood stream by Bácillus mucosus-capsulatus secondary to chronic purulent otitis media of the right ear of almost four years' duration. Two months after the patient had had a mastoidectomy followed by an uninterrupted recovery, he was readmitted to the hospital. He complained of severe cold in the head and that for fourteen days he had suffered from severe headaches and intense pains at the back of the neck. Two days after admission, he died. The

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