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Article
July 1931

THE INTERPRETATION OF CONDUCTION DEAFNESS: REPORT OF TWO UNUSUAL CASES

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Anatomy, St. Louis University School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1931;14(1):48-63. doi:10.1001/archotol.1931.03580020056008
Abstract

Conduction deafness, as the term indicates, implies a disability in the apparatus for the transmission of sound and is synonymous with middle ear deafness. The amount of lowering of the acuity for hearing sounds transmitted by air conduction is necessarily dependent on the degree and the nature of the disability and attains a maximum under conditions of a complete structural or functional loss of the sound transmission system. The functional efficiency of the drum membrane and ossicular chain in the transmission of sounds by air conduction might be considered to be thoroughly established if one takes as evidence the almost universal agreement found in the published statements related to this problem. A review of the literature is unnecessary and only four abstracts will be submitted, three of which echo the consensus and one arrives at a similar conclusion in an entirely different manner.

Mangold1 considered the physiology of the

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