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Article
December 1931

THE RELATION OF THE NASAL SINUSES TO ASTHMA

Arch Otolaryngol. 1931;14(6):784-792. doi:10.1001/archotol.1931.03580020875007
Abstract

Asthma has been variously defined as due to a neurosis, a vasomotor neurosis, a toxemia and a hypersensitiveness to a foreign protein.

James Adam, in his work published in 1913, summarized his points in the following statements:

Asthma is primarily a toxaemia.

This toxaemia arises partly in the bowel, partly in the tissues; it arises partly by absorption of nitrogenous poisons resulting from intestinal putrefaction under microbic action; but mainly is due to an error in nitrogenous metabolism, the result of imperfect oxidation or enzyme action. In short, the poison from proteid food or proteid tissue.

The error in proteid metabolism is closely connected with excess of carbohydrate in the diet.

The toxaemia, whether arising in bowel or tissue or both, tends to show itself first as catarrh, later as spasm, in the respiratory tract. This toxaemia shows itself in conditions, catarrhal and spasmodic, other than, but closely related to,

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