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Article
January 1932

CHICAGO LARYNGOLOGICAL AND OTOLOGICAL SOCIETY: Regular Meeting, Oct. 5, 1931

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;15(1):139-148. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.03570030154009

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Abstract

THE MECHANICS OF AUDITION. DR. A. G. POHLMAN.

Audition is dependent on the conduction of vibrations that lie within the audible range to the end-organ, and on the transformation of the stimuli at the end-organ into action currents which are translated by the brain into terms of the sources. It is well known that the development of the vertebrate ear seemingly violates the physical requirements essential to an organ of great sensitivity, because the perceptive apparatus is an immersion end-organ, and because air sounds are almost completely reflected back in their conduction to water. The development of an immersion end-organ, however, fulfils the physiologic requirement of placing the perceptive apparatus under conditions of acoustic insulation, which permits great sensitivity in response. The acoustic insulation is overcome through the development of a middle ear that acts as a transformer to match the differences in resistance in the two mediums. The evidence

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