[Skip to Navigation]
Article
March 1932

THE HISTOPATHOLOGIC REACTIONS OF THE TRACHEOTOMIC WOUND: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;15(3):389-412. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.03570030407006
Abstract

The operation of tracheotomy dates back to the earliest times recorded in medical history. In the first century B. C., Asclepiades of Bithnia saved several lives by opening the trachea, the procedure being first known as bronchotomy. Aretius, however, later condemned the operation as tending to increase tracheal inflammation and because, as he said, the cartilaginous parts could not grow together again after their separation, a fact indicative of an interest even at this early date in the healing of the wound itself. Antyllus, in the second century B. C., called attention to tracheotomy in the treatment for cases of foreign body, and again there is evidence at this time of a curiosity as to the end-results of tracheotomy, for it is recorded that an Arabian physician, Ibn Zoar, divided the tracheal cartilages of a goat in order to prove that the cartilaginous wound could heal.

In the middle

×