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Article
March 1932

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF PHILADELPHIA, SECTION ON OTOLARYNGOLOGY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;15(3):491-495. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.03570030509020

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Abstract

MOTIONPICTURES OF THELARYNX. DR. C. A. HEATLEY, Rochester, N. Y. (by invitation).

In presenting a short film of motion pictures of the larynx, the important possibilities of laryngeal photography in the teaching of laryngology as well as in recording rare cases, were stressed. There is great difficulty in photographing small objects. In 1883, Lenox Brown took the first photograph of the larynx, but he and his co-workers saw no future for photography of the larynx. Thomas French, in 1884, produced photographs of really surprising merit by attaching a camera to a mirror and reflecting sunlight toward the patient's larynx by means of a system of truncated cones. Later he developed a powerful arc light which accomplished the same end. This work was forgotten until 1913, when Garel produced the stereoscopic camera. Dr. Clerf has used this camera sufficiently to be most familiar with its intricacies. Most of

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