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Article
April 1932

APPARENT EFFECTS OF CEREBRAL TUMOR ON AUDITORY ACUITY: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

EVANSTON, ILL.
From the Departments of Otolaryngology of the Evanston Hospital and Northwestern University.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;15(4):583-591. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.03570030602009
Abstract

Consideration of this subject is undertaken with the knowledge that investigators in otology and neurologic surgery are not agreed concerning the mechanism of, or even the existence of, diminished auditory acuity from tumor of the cerebrum and particularly of the temporal lobe. The auditory symptoms produced must arise from interruption of auditory pathways at the site of the tumor by actual destruction or, secondarily, from pressure on other portions of the auditory pathways, and also from mental fogging and failure to interpret auditory impulses.

It is well known that reduction of hearing may be caused by lesions in any way affecting the auditory pathway from the sensory end-organ to the cortex. Labyrinthine deafness may develop gradually on one or both sides, or occasionally it may suddenly develop on one side. It is usually accompanied by vertigo and nystagmus. Lesions in the peripheral neurons cause gradual deafness through atrophy

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