[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1932

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF PHILADELPHIA, SECTION ON OTOLOGY AND LARYNGOLOGY: Feb. 17, 1932

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;15(5):793-796. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.03570030814015

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

SINUSITIS AND THE RÔLE IT PLAYS IN THE PRODUCTION OF ASTHMA. DR. H. B. WILMER.

It is well recognized by most observers in the field of allergy that subacute and chronic infections of the upper respiratory tract, such as sinusitis, tonsillitis and adenoiditis, are important etiologic and contributory factors in the causation of asthma; but they are at variance as to the relative importance of such factors and the mechanisms by which they operate.

It is definite, and, I believe, thoroughly possible that, in asthma as well as in hay fever, nasal infection may play the rôle of an excitant as well as a complicating factor.

Quoting Gottlieb, the upper respiratory tract may cause bronchial asthma by one of the following explanations:

  1. 1. Constant drainage of pus into the trachea and bronchi.

  2. 2. Toxic absorption from damming up pus in the sinuses.

  3. 3. Mechanical obstruction of the air passages causing

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×