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Article
June 1932

SUPPURATIVE MENINGITIS OF OTITIC AND NASAL ORIGIN: ITS RELATION TO BLOOD STREAM INVASION OF THE PIAL VESSELS

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;15(6):885-905. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.03570030907007
Abstract

During the past few years, 367 persons with suppurative meningitis originating from the ear or nose were admitted at the Newark Eye and Ear Infirmary and the Newark City Hospital. Two hundred and thirteen patients were operated on; of these, 145 died, 68 recovered (about 32 per cent), and 105 autopsies were performed.1

This report is an attempt to summarize this experience and to add what knowledge has been acquired since my last reports.2 Its chief value lies in the surgical information obtained from the autopsies, each autopsy having been conducted to ascertain (a) the particular lesion present, (b) what had been accomplished by the treatment and (c) whether further or different surgical measures might not have resulted in the patient's recovery.

SUBARACHNOID SPACE MENINGITIS VERSUS MENINGITIS SECONDARY TO PHLEBITIS OF ARACHNOID VESSELS

Surgically, there are two types of meningitis, depending on (a) the mode of entrance into

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