[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.226.234.102. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Article
July 1932

MÉNIÈRE'S SYNDROME IN AN OTHERWISE HEALTHY PERSON: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;16(1):90-91. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.00630040097011

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Ménière was the first to describe the sudden occurrence of a symptom complex which has since been designated as the Ménière syndrome. This is the apoplectiform occurrence of deafness, tinnitus and vertigo in a person whose ears previously have been normal. Ménière published reports in a series of cases. An autopsy was held in one case, that of a young girl who died a few days after the onset of the aural condition; the labyrinth was found filled with grumous material, which Ménière assumed to be a blood clot.

A modified Ménière syndrome may occur from a variety of conditions, including a fracture of the base of the skull passing through the labyrinth, injury to the labyrinth during operation on the mastoid, and an acute labyrinthitis occurring from an extension of the inflammation of meningitis either by the internal meatus or by suppuration from the middle ear. A

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×