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Article
August 1932

PRIMARY MALIGNANT TUMORS OF THE LOWER THIRD OF THE TRACHEA: REPORT OF A CASE WITH SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT BY ELECTROFULGURATION AND DEEP X-RAYS

Author Affiliations

Assistant Resident Surgeon in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Johns Hopkins Hospital; Assistant Instructor in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Johns Hopkins Medical School BALTIMORE
From the Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;16(2):182-187. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.00630040191004
Abstract

"The lower portion of the trachea is very rarely the seat of tumors," stated Ewing.1 An examination of the literature reveals that there are on record but twenty-four cases of carcinoma of the lower third of the trachea. D'Aunoy and Zoeller2 were able to collect only nineteen cases in a survey covering a period extending through 1929. Since that time there have been but five other cases reported. A perusal of the clinical records of the Johns Hopkins Hospital reveals the fact that the case that I shall present is the only one of primary carcinoma of the lower third of the trachea seen in that institution during its forty-two years of existence. Correctly enough, it could be argued that, while the previously mentioned figures would lead one to believe that tracheal tumors were rare, the actual state of affairs might be, as Chevalier Jackson declared when he

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