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Article
September 1932

LUDWIG'S ANGINA: INTRA-ORAL INCISION IN INFECTIONS OF THE FLOOR OF THE MOUTH

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Otolaryngology, the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;16(3):317-328. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.00630040327001
Abstract

HISTORICAL DATA

Almost one hundred years ago (1836) Ludwig1 published his observations on the oral inflammation that later was to bear his name. In the years immediately following, considerable publicity was given to this malady, but it was not until half a century later that the interesting discussions of this type of angina by the French Surgical Society occurred. At this time there was so much debate regarding the propriety of considering the disease an entity that two opposing factions were born. One, headed by Delorme, advocated the idea; the other, sponsored by Nélaton, was opposed. Early in the twentieth century, the publications in America by Davis,2 Thomas3 and Price4 resulted in further discussion and aided greatly in the present-day conception of the disease. As a result, at the present time the term Ludwig's angina has practically universal acceptance.

INCIDENCE OF THE DISEASE;

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