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Article
September 1932

CEREBROSPINAL RHINORRHEA: A REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Otolaryngology of the University of Pennsylvania and Misericordia Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;16(3):350-359. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.00630040360004
Abstract

During the past year I have had two cases of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, both of which were most instructive. One was spontaneous; one was traumatic. One patient is living; one is dead. Both presented points of interest; one perhaps contains a lesson, and I believe that both should be recorded. In the hope that they will prove of value, the history of each is presented herewith.

THE SPONTANEOUS CASE

History.—A woman, aged 60, was referred by Dr. John Ritchie on July 2, 1930. She was an unusually stout woman, weighing 225 pounds (102 Kg.); she had been obese since childhood, but had always enjoyed good health. In February, following an attack of influenza, she noticed a watery discharge from the right side of her nose. Recovery from the influenza was uneventful, and she resumed her household duties, but every morning awoke with a severe bitemporal headache. At 9 or 10

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