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Article
September 1932

A NEW TEST FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF DISEASE OF THE INNER EAR

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO; VIENNA, AUSTRIA
From the ear department of the Wiener Allgemeine Poliklinik, service of Professor Gustav Alexander.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;16(3):360-363. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.00630040370005
Abstract

That the auricles of both human beings and animals show involuntary movement on acoustic irritation has been established in the otologic literature since the beginning of the last century. Known as Preyer's reflex, since Preyer1 revealed that the striking of tuning forks caused an involuntary jerking reflex of the auricle in new-born guinea-pigs and young rats, this phenomenon has been noted time and again, and is constantly employed in physiologic experimentation on animals as a proof that the animal hears. This reflex movement has also been discerned in man, and is described in the older as well as in the newer handbooks on otology. Lincke2 and Politzer3 frequently found patients having pathologic conditions in the ear who showed unconscious movements of the auricle either in a single circumscribed sector or in toto. Similar observations were mentioned by Urbantschitsch4 and Lucae.5 Schaefer and Giesswein

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