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Article
October 1932

A CASE OF AGRANULOCYTIC ANGINA WITH APPARENT RECOVERY

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;16(4):566-570. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.00630040578012
Abstract

In 1922, Werner Schultz, of Berlin, described a definite disease entity to which he gave the name "agranulocytic angina." The disease is characterized by a sudden onset, with high fever and general malaise. The tonsils and the surrounding structures, including the gums, the tongue, the larynx, the buccal surfaces and the floor of the mouth, show superficial ulcerations, gangrenous changes and diphtheritic-appearing membranes. The genitalia are often similarly involved. There is usually icterus; the spleen and liver are slightly, if at all, enlarged, and there is frequently a generalized swelling of the glands of the gastro-intestinal tract. The blood picture is characteristic and is the important diagnostic factor. The hemoglobin is not reduced; the white cell count ranges from several hundred to zero, with few or no granulated cells; the red blood cells are not abnormal, and there is no hemorrhagic diathesis. A culture of the blood may or

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