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Article
October 1932

UNILATERAL ADDUCTOR PARALYSIS: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

OAKLAND, CALIF.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1932;16(4):570-573. doi:10.1001/archotol.1932.00630040582013
Abstract

Pure adductor paralysis of the larynx appears to be sufficiently rare in the literature to be worthy of recording. A recent review by Waltz1 revealed that there was very little on the subject, either in case reports or in theoretical discussion. The entity is described briefly in textbooks, with a long list of rather indefinite causes. There is, of course, considerable literature on total or recurrent paralysis, and in such cases the causes and care appear to be well understood.

I suspect that one reason for the apparent rarity of this lesion is that cases of laryngeal paralysis, whether with or without hoarseness, and whether the cord is in the cadaveric or in the midline position, are all classed together simply as recurrent laryngeal paralysis.2 No serious attempt is made at differentiation. The vulnerability of the recurrent nerves, owing to their long looplike course in

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