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Article
July 1933

BENIGN TUMORS OF THE TONSIL: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO FIBROMA

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Department of Otolaryngology, White Memorial Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1933;18(1):62-69. doi:10.1001/archotol.1933.03580060068006
Abstract

Benign tumors of the tonsils are rare. The growths in this region are papillomas, angiomas, lymphomas, adenomas, fibromas, lipomas, chondromas, teratomas and various forms of mixed tumors. The faucial tonsils are developed in the second branchial cleft. This is approximately the meeting place of the oral epiblast and the intestinal hypoblast. From an embryologic point of view, the union of the two different tissues forms a most favorable site for a neoplastic growth. The apparent discrepancy in the clinical observation and the embryologic postulate was explained by Fox (quoted by Bosworth1); the morbid processes in the tonsils occur chiefly in the early period of life, while in adult life there are general retrogressive changes of the lymphoid tissue and the tonsils become masses of inert structure.

According to Vidau,2 the first report of a case of benign neoplasm of the tonsil was published by Robert in 1827, and

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