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Article
October 1933

CHRONIC PARANASAL SINUS INFECTION: RELATION TO DISEASES OF THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; Instructor in Otolaryngology, University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA
From the Division of Medicine and the Division of Otolaryngology, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1933;18(4):425-429. doi:10.1001/archotol.1933.03580060457002
Abstract

Acute inflammation of the paranasal sinuses is probably as common as the common cold. In most instances it is probably as transient. Chronic sinusitis is, however, also an extremely common disease. While at times a purely local condition, it is often associated with other diseases of the respiratory tract, diseases to which the sinus condition may be secondary, or in the causation of which the sinus disease may play a part.

A prime and obvious factor in the production of chronic sinus disease is bacterial invasion. A second well recognized factor is the presence of an intranasal anatomic abnormality, such as marked septal deflection, which interferes with the free drainage of the sinuses. Repeated infection associated with the anatomic defect serves in time to destroy the ciliated epithelium of the sinuses, putting out of action an important mechanism in normal drainage of the sinuses, and thereby tending to make the

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