[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.206.177.17. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Article
November 1933

ROUTES OF INFECTION IN OTOGENOUS MENINGITIS: A FULMINANT CASE OF HEMATOGENOUS ORIGIN THROUGH ANOMALOUS VASCULAR ANASTOMOSES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1933;18(5):614-621. doi:10.1001/archotol.1933.03580060656003
Abstract

In recent years the pathways by which infection may pass from the middle ear to the brain have been the object of an increasing amount of attention. Especially have the investigations lately carried out by Eagleton1 and by Friesner and Druss2 thrown new light on a subject that had heretofore been enshrouded with obscurity.

It has long been recognized that a considerable percentage of inflammations of the middle ear lead ultimately to complications within the cranial cavity or within the adjoining large blood vessels. A large number of possible routes of infection have been established, some of which are more frequently followed than others.

In early days extension by contact infection was the only way considered, as this was the least difficult to account for. Under this concept, infection is carried immediately from the middle ear to the membrane separating it from the cranial cavity, whether this membrane

×