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Article
December 1933

EFFECTS OF DRUGS ON VESTIBULAR REACTIONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Otolaryngology and Physiology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1933;18(6):753-759. doi:10.1001/archotol.1933.00630060813003
Abstract

The demand for some drug which will act specifically to reduce the irritability of the vestibular apparatus is great. For a long time general sedatives, such as bromides and opium derivatives, have been employed with some degree of success. The chief objection to these is that when a sufficient amount is prescribed to reduce vertigo, the patient is incapacitated by the general depression. Several years ago Jonkhoff1 and de Kleyn and Versteegh2 reported that the vestibular apparatus was decidedly influenced by a number of drugs. This led us3 to study the effects of drugs on vestibular reactions. The outstanding compounds of each pharmacologic group were used. The nystagmic reaction to rotation was taken as the measure of the degree of stimulation of the vestibular system. As no operations were performed, there was no question of allowances for mutilation. The results were disappointing. There was

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