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Article
February 1934

IRRIGATION IN THE TREATMENT OF DISEASE OF THE FRONTAL SINUS: ANATOMIC CLINICAL STUDY OF THE NASOFRONTAL CONNECTIONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology and the Department of Anatomy, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;19(2):224-246. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03790020070007
Abstract

In the early eighties of the last century surgical treatment of the frontal sinus consisted merely of a trephine opening through the outer plate with subsequent drainage through the operative wound.

In 1884, Ogston,1 of Aberdeen, recognized the importance of maintaining a pathway of drainage through the nose. Failing in his endeavors to sound the sinus through the natural opening, he devised his classic external operation, which included enlargement of the ostium frontale.

Since then many external and internal operations have been designed for treatment of disease of the frontal sinus. The various methods adopted range between the simple conservative and the extreme radical. The ability of the rhinologist to reach the sinus through the natural opening is important in the intranasal treatment. He may rarely feel the need of this procedure; the other methods of therapy may suffice.

Nevertheless, a dependable technic for this maneuver is a valuable

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