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Article
March 1934

CALCULI IN THE SUBMAXILLARY AND SUBLINGUAL GLANDS AND THEIR DUCTS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;19(3):318-325. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03790030023004
Abstract

Calculi in the submaxillary and sublingual gland or their ducts are not common. In contrast to stones in other regions of the body, particularly in the gallbladder and kidneys, those in the salivary gland have assumed a minor place. Nevertheless, they have been of sufficient interest to have been reported since the dawn of modern medicine. Hencke and Erdmann were able to collect approximately four hundred cases from the literature. In the past decade this number has been greatly increased.1

The calculi that occur in the gland proper do not, as a rule, give pronounced symptoms. They may be single or multiple. Béclère2 reported a case in which a bilateral involvement of the submaxillary gland was found to be present. Calculi may manifest symptoms sufficient to warrant radical treatment, but fortunately, so far as the gland is concerned, this is the exception. This is the opinion of most

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