[Skip to Navigation]
Article
March 1934

ETIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY OF PARALYSIS OF THE ABDUCENS NERVE ASSOCIATED WITH SINUS THROMBOPHLEBITIS: REPORT OF A CASE OF THROMBOSIS OF THE LATERAL SINUS AND BILATERAL PARALYSIS OF THE ABDUCENS NERVE; OPERATION AND RECOVERY

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;19(3):336-347. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03790030041006
Abstract

Paralysis of the abducens nerve is the commonest of isolated oculoorbital palsies.1 Bilateral occurrence is exceedingly rare. In regard to the etiologic factors, reference is here made solely to those peripheral causes which may involve the nerve trunk in its intracranial course after leaving the brain stem.

The occurrence of this condition secondary to disease of the petrous tip is fairly common and has of late occupied no small share in otologic literature. Gradenigo,2 in 1904, first identified palsy of the external rectus with suppurations of the middle ear and thereby established the clinical entity or syndrome which was accepted by otologists for many years. Perkins,3 in 1910, outlined rather generally the various pathways through which infection from the tympanum and mastoid gained access to the petrous pyramid. As time went by, the conception of the pathologic processes involved became more and more lucid as a result

Add or change institution
×