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Article
June 1934

TEMPERATURE AFTER MASTOIDECTOMY: A STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED CASES

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ME.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;19(6):660-670. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03790060009002
Abstract

Since the earliest times the rise in the temperature of the body which accompanies most diseases has held the interest of physicians. The old conceptions of this pathologic condition have been so revolutionized that an elevation of temperature has become one of the most important and valuable of diagnostic symptoms. The presence of fever is capable of a wide range of interpretation, because a large number of diseases or conditions may produce it. When a satisfactory explanation cannot be given for an existing fever, careful search should be made for the cause. One should not be content until it is found or all diagnostic resources are exhausted.

The ideas on the significance and nature of fever repeatedly changed until the clinical thermometer came into general use about 1870. Carl Wunderlich's famous treatise, written in 1868, on the relation of animal heat to disease is, according to Garrison,1 the very foundation

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