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Article
July 1934

MÉNIÈRE'S DISEASESYMPTOMS, OBJECTIVE FINDINGS AND TREATMENT IN FORTY-TWO CASES

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;20(1):1-30. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03600010008001
Abstract

In earlier publications1 I have shown that Ménière's disease may be permanently cured, with scarcely any risk to life or function. In the entire series which I studied there was no death, and, except in two early cases in which the facial nerve was injured, there was no complication. With the more recent hemisection of the auditory nerve, instead of total section, even the loss of residual hearing—the only function affected by total section and usually of little practical value—may be avoided. In no case has there been, so far as I know, a single attack of dizziness subsequent to the operation.

With the advent of partial section of the auditory nerve (i. e., total section of the vestibular branch and preservation of the cochlear branch), one is naturally led to wonder whether, if this form of treatment were applied in the early stages of the disease, it might

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