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Article
August 1934

A COMBINED AIR AND BONE CONDUCTION TEST FOR PRETENDED DEAFNESS

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Departments of Otolaryngology of the Long Island College Hospital and the Israel-Zion Hospital.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;20(2):214-218. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03600020078009

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Abstract

The various tests devised for unmasking simulated monaural deafness are of either the air conduction or the osseous conduction type. While both methods are frequently employed in testing the hearing capacity of the same person they have not been used simultaneously.

The sources of sound utilized in these tests are: (1) the human voice; (2) tuning forks; (3) ticking instruments, as a watch, clock or metronome; (4) clicking instruments or objects, as Politzer's acoumeter, coins or any other metallic substances which, when struck together, emit a clanking sound; (5) musical instruments, and (6) electric apparatus.

The voice would be the most useful source of sound for testing purposes if it were not for the many drawbacks which render it impracticable. The voice is variable in quantity and quality. The volume cannot easily be gaged or controlled. The composition of speech is such that its essential elements vary greatly in capacity

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