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Article
October 1934

BACTEREMIA AND ACUTE INFECTIONS OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;20(4):452-459. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03600040008002
Abstract

Acute infections of the upper respiratory tract are usually ushered in by the common cold. Many different organisms have been suspected to be the causative agent. The known pathogenic bacteria that are found in the nose and throat at most times are the various streptococci, pneumococci, staphylococci, certain gram-negative cocci and Pfeiffer's bacillus1 or, as it is known today, Haemophilus influenzae.

The possibility that a filtrable virus is the cause of the common cold was first suggested by Kruse2 in 1914. He reported the experimental production of colds by means of a bacteria-free filtrate. Foster3 obtained similar results. However, many other observers have failed to confirm Kruse's findings. Dochez and his associates4 reported the experimental transmission of the common cold to anthropoid apes and human beings by means of a filtrable agent. Their work on chimpanzees is suggestive experimental evidence that the etiologic agent of the

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