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Article
October 1934

PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING CILIARY ACTIVITY IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT: II. A COMPARISON OF NASAL CLEARANCE IN MAN, MONKEY AND OTHER MAMMALS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Anatomy, Washington University School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;20(4):518-541. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03600040074006
Abstract

The cilia within the nose and paranasal sinuses are the chief agent in maintaining the normal clearance of the nose. Their integration, reducing to a minimum uneven stresses on the mucous sheet, is maintained in spite of the structural complexity of the mammalian nose. Such a delicate balance of directional movements and forces must operate in conformity with certain principles which, once revealed, will serve as a standard of measurement by which the rationale of some clinical procedures may be evaluated.

That such principles exist became evident as a result of studies1 on the ciliary movement in the nasal cavity and maxillary sinus of Macacus rhesus. Yates2 previously published an account of mucous drainage in the posterior part of the human nose. These observations have been admirably supplemented by those of Hilding,3 who extended this survey on man to include the inferior two thirds of the nasal

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