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Article
December 1934

PRENATAL MEDICATION AS A POSSIBLE ETIOLOGIC FACTOR OF DEAFNESS IN THE NEW-BORN

Author Affiliations

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;20(6):790-803. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03600060027003
Abstract

The study of deafness and its etiology has received more attention in the last decade than in any other period of history. Much light has been thrown on the subject, many new theories have been advanced and many old ones abandoned. It is generally estimated that there are now more than 10,000,000 deaf persons in the United States, 3,000,000 of whom are children. These statistics have doubtless been a stimulus to the otologist in studying the various phases of deafness. The report of the committee on statistical studies of the children in public schools for the deaf,1 made to the National Research Council, states that of 5,348 deaf children examined by the committee, 3,334, or 62.15 per cent, were classified as congenitally deaf. It also states that congenital syphilis plays only a small part as a causative factor of deafness. This finding is in line with the assertions of

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