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Article
December 1934

SINUS HEADACHE: DIFFERENTIATED FROM HEADACHES OF OTHER ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Laryngology, Jefferson Medical College.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1934;20(6):813-819. doi:10.1001/archotol.1934.03600060050005
Abstract

This brief article can deal but casually with the outstanding features of pain primarily due to sinusitis and enumerate some of the most common causes of headache due to other constitutional disorders.

It is sometimes difficult to distinguish between the pains of sinusitis and those due to other causes. Authorities such as Skillern,1 Hajek2 and others have lamented the fact that far too frequently the sinuses have been operated on, and later it has been found that an intracranial or other type of lesion had been the source of the pain. Recently there has been an increasing tendency to assume too readily that obscure pains in the head are of sinusal origin and to forget that sinusitis may exist without pain. The degree of the severity of pain is not a reliable index of the seriousness of the disease. In sinusitis the absence of pain proves nothing, while

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