[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1935

CANCER OF THE LARYNX: OBSERVATIONS IN TWO HUNDRED CONSECUTIVE CASES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the bronchoscopic clinics of the University of Pennsylvania, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the Graduate Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(1):1-8. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020008001
Abstract

The study of a series of 200 cases of cancer of the larynx grouped in the order in which the patients came for examination gave data on the points that are usually considered in the study of laryngeal cases, which I believe may be of interest to laryngologists. In presenting these observations nothing new or final is claimed. The patients were referred to the bronchoscopic clinics of the University of Pennsylvania primarily for diagnosis.1 A number of the patients were sent back to the referring physician for treatment, either surgical, by irradiation or palliative only, as indicated in the particular cases. In many of the cases the condition was far advanced when the patient presented himself for examination, and no treatment other than palliative could be given. In the consideration of the data obtained from this study, therefore, the work of a number of surgeons and roentgenologists

×