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Article
January 1935

CONSERVATIVE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF HYPERTROPHIC RHINITIS

Author Affiliations

DAYTON, OHIO

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(1):59-63. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020066006
Abstract

Every physician sees many patients whose chief complaint is a "stuffy nose." The degree of nasal respiratory impediment may vary from occasional stuffiness to almost complete obstruction for a long period. The vasomotor control of the nasal mucous membrane is most active in the second decade of life and is closely associated with, and influenced by, the physiologic changes incident to puberty. This activity often continues into the third or fourth decade of life, with all of the ill effects of mouth breathing and aprosexia due to insufficient nasal ventilation. In addition to recognizing these physiologic changes, one must properly study and evaluate the physical condition of the nasal fossae, such as septal deformities and the position and contour of the inferior turbinates. Today there is a great tendency for physicians, when called on to treat these conditions, to begin at once to look for an intrinsic or extrinsic

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