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Article
February 1935

INTRANASAL VACCINE SPRAY: ITS USE FOR PROPHYLAXIS AGAINST THE COMMON COLD

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, the University of Chicago.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(2):147-153. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020156003
Abstract

Vaccine therapy for the prevention of colds has been used for years with indifferent success. Reports on series of patients who have been treated by the subcutaneous injection of vaccines of various compositions have appeared in the literature since 1909. Extensive studies, for the most part adequately controlled, have been carried out in both this country and Europe, and although there have been observers who have reported excellent results, the general consensus seems to indicate that the results of the use of subcutaneous vaccination as a prophylaxis against colds have been disappointing.

Probably the most extensive controlled series so far recorded are that of von Sholly and Park,1 reported in 1921, and that of Jordan and Sharp,2 reported in the same year. Von Sholly and Park, working among the general employees of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company's home office in New York, gave injections of vaccine

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