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Article
March 1935

FISSULA ANTE FENESTRAMITS FORM AND CONTENTS IN EARLY LIFE

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(3):303-323. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020313007
Abstract

The fissula ante fenestram has come to be regarded as a constant feature of the human ear and is believed to occur typically as a channel within the bone containing an avascular connective tissue. In early corrosion preparations described by Hyrtl1 in 1845 and by Siebenmann2 in 1890 only the medial end of the fissula was demonstrated, and in their figures it appears as a macroscopic projection of the anterior portion of the vestibule. Later, Mayer3 (1917) and others have described and figured the full structure with its termination on the wall of the tympanic cavity. They have emphasized that it is a fissure-like band of connective tissue within bone, and, because of its location between the cochlear and the canalicular portion of the capsule, they have maintained that it serves as a synchondrosis between them, absorbing the strains incident to growth.

From a study

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