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Article
April 1935

CAVERNOUS SINUS THROMBOSIS OF DENTAL ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Hospital for Joint Diseases.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(4):442-447. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020454006
Abstract

From a study of the anatomy1 one can readily appreciate from what varied sources the cavernous sinus is subject to attack. In a word,2 infection anywhere about the head may, under suitable circumstances, lead to this complication.

MECHANICS

When acute bacterial infection is present about a small blood vessel (capillary or venule), transfusion of the bacterial toxins through the wall of the vessel may cause injury to the endothelial lining cells. These become swollen and blood clot is deposited in them. The thrombus at the primary site may become infected with the bacteria, or the latter may enter the vessel directly, form a colony and a thrombus form about the colony. After the initial clot has formed it may extend by successive additions up the main vessel of the area.

The pterygoid plexus drains the alveolar processes of the upper and lower jaws through the branches of the

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