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Article
April 1935

EXPERIMENTALLY INCREASED INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

URBANA, ILL.; AUGUSTA, GA.; URBANA, ILL.
From the Laboratory of Animal Hearing, University of Illinois, and the University of Georgia School of Medicine.

Arch Otolaryngol. 1935;21(4):464-465. doi:10.1001/archotol.1935.00640020476010
Abstract

Patients with increased intracranial pressure usually present complications which interfere with an answer to the question as to what part of the syndrome is produced by pressure on nerve cells and what part by cerebral anemia. The present work was designed to find whether a rise in intracranial pressure affects auditory sensitivity.

Two animals were trained to flex the right foreleg whenever a sound stimulus was given. (Pure tones of 125, 1,000 and 8,000 cycles were used as stimuli.) As the tone was made progressively weaker, the animal continued to react until the tone became no longer audible, whereupon the response ceased. In this way it was possible to determine the animal's acuity of hearing. After the animal's normal threshold of hearing had been ascertained, a threaded metal tube was screwed into a trephine opening in the skull, directly beneath which was an incision in the dura. This was

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